23 July 2013

What Is GOOD Art?

What Is Good Art?

Current mood:artistic 

Over the years, I've addressed the question What Is Art?

I've received many responses (thank you), and just as many opinions on the subject. After I began reading the responses, I realized that some of the responders failed to see the difference between "Art" and "Good Art." Just because you don't like it or appreciate it, doesn't mean that it isn't Art.

I stick by my original definition:

Art is that which is created, and is perceived to be as such by humans.

The point of this blog is to inquire about what you feel is "good art," and why. The term "good" is highly subjective, which is why I am asking what you prefer. You and I may not agree on what constitutes good art.

Some enjoy Pollock, believing that his collage of splatter exhibits freedom from rigid tradition and form.

Others like the raw emotion of outsider art, unfiltered by classical training and tradition.


This art rebels against the limits of coloring within the lines, or even coloring within the canvas. The negative canvas space contrasting with the dark coloration of the wall speaks volumes. Surely this is good art!

There are those who wonder why we even need walls for art, and prefer three dimensions to convey the artistic message.


2006_HeadOn_1.jpg
Head On, 2006, Cai Guoquiang.

Many firmly believe that truly good art should never be limited to the confines of buildings, and needs to be experienced rather than simply viewed.

The Gates (2005), Central Park, NYC

But why stop there? Exceptionally good art must be big, and not restricted to land. Right? 
Surrounded Islands, (1981), Miami, FL

 
While all of the above is Art, I don't find any of it to be particularly good.


At the end of the day, this is still what I consider to be good art:
Scene from Thanatopsis, 1850, Asher B. Durand

4 comments:

  1. The very question of good art establishes a hierarchy that instantly negates the concept of art. I will quote from Maclolm in the Middle: "It's not supposed to be good, it's supposed to be hard to do."

    But then again, I can't draw very well, so always consider the source.

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    1. You're a pretty good source if one is interested in hearing from creative people.

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  2. Art, as originally conceived, is about expression. Over time, like most human endeavors, it becomes an issue of ego, prestige, and all the other petty trappings we get so worked up about.

    Personally, I appreciate the skill of the old masters and the primal beauty of the paintings of elephants and primates that is far closer to our original ancestors than we seem to be.

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    1. I too enjoy paintings by elephants. I like those more than the art that feels forced into spectacle or outlandishness.

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